New Exhibit @Miner: “Postcards from Puerto Rico”

June 7, 2018

Hurricane Maria sliced through Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017.

We’ve all heard the sound bytes:

  • The worst natural disaster on record to affect Dominica and Puerto Rico
  • Winds at 175 mph
  • 70,000 homes leveled
  • 3 million people without power or water
  • Health care system in tatters

As an Upstate New York resident, I have a hard time relating to these numbers and to this level of devastation.

“Postcards from Puerto Rico,” an exhibit highlighting some of the people from University of Rochester and our community who came together to support Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, brings it home for me.

Last October, 11 providers from the UR Medical Center departed for Puerto Rico. They joined about 70 other physicians and nurses from across New York state. They assisted with emergency operations and health care planning at medical sites, provided hands-on patient care, and more. They spent two weeks on the island at a time when it was largely without power and adequate supplies.

Read more>> https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5165/urmc-providers-join-forces-for-relief-efforts-in-puerto-rico.aspx

Life Straw water filtration system

Wendy Allen-Thompson, Luis Rosario-McCabe, Tim Dye, and others shared their photos and first-person narratives with us, which are displayed as postcards.

Now, I can connect faces and voices to the devastation. It’s personal.

Tim wonders, “How could people survive what must have been an incredibly traumatic 10-hour blasting of this storm?…How could anyone recover from such a trauma?”

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season began June 1. And I can’t get Tim’s words out of my head.

According to Sheri Fink (The New York Times, May 29, 2018), “As hurricane season begins this week, experts are still trying to count the number of deaths caused by last year’s devastating Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. The latest estimate: roughly 4,600, many of them from delayed medical care.”

Experts disagree on predictions for the 2018 hurricane season. But, as Marshall Shepherd said in his June 2 Forbes article, “Irrespective of how many storms are predicted, it only takes one storm to cause a human tragedy.”

September 20, 2017, was…and still is…a human tragedy.


Additional resources, provided by Tim Dye
•  WXXI News
Connections: An update on the crisis in Puerto Rico, and cultural competency in medical care (50:16) http://wxxinews.org/post/connections-update-crisis-puerto-rico-and-cultural-competency-medical-care
•  Our mobile clinic concept (0:56) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaGBwkZ6FAY 
•  Sobre las conciencias de los hombres: A medical ecological view on post-Maria Puerto Rico
http://tinyurl.com/conciencias1 (Part 1)
http://tinyurl.com/conciencias2 (Part 2)
https://tinyurl.com/conciencias3 (Part 3)

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Edward G. Miner Library is open Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

This article was submitted by Susan Andersen


On exhibit @Miner: “Portraits of Perseverance” by Charmaine Wheatley

March 1, 2018

Artist-in-Residence, Charmaine Wheatley, continues to challenge our hearts and minds in the second half of her residency with “Portraits of Perseverance.”

From January through June, 2017, Wheatley focused on the mental health community of Rochester. Since July, she has engaged the HIV populations of Rochester and Buffalo.

Wheatley’s technique is informal, charming, and spontaneous. Each portrait is a pocket-sized 4” x 7-3/8.” Fragments of her conversations with her subjects are integrated within the final piece. She uses watercolor, ink, gel pen, graphite, and gouache on paper.

Can we reconcile the impact of this monstrous pandemic with these playful and colorful portraits? That’s one of the challenges Wheatley hands us. The other challenge? Get rid of the stigma you may harbor.

“De-stigmatizing happens through humanizing,” says Wheatley. So each portrait sitting involves an open-hearted discussion about living with, or loving someone with, HIV/AIDS.

Portraits by Charmaine Wheatley

Wheatley’s artist-in-residency has several sponsors, including the Center for AIDS Research, the Department of Psychiatry, the Division of Medical Humanities and Bioethics, URBEST, the Office of the SMD Vice Dean for Research, the School of Nursing, as well as programmatic support from the Memorial Art Gallery, the Neuroscience Program, and the Department of Art and Art History.

For more information about the project, visit bit.ly/cwartistinresidence and www.artreducingstigma.com.

About the artist: Since graduating from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Wheatley has received grants from the Canada Council for the Arts; Arts Nova Scotia; and Arts Newfoundland Labrador. During her on-going artist residency at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, she sat in the “Living Room” with museum patrons and employees. An installation of 104 of these portraits is on the view at the museum. Recent related portrait work includes two artist residencies with senior centers in Brooklyn in 2016 (Krakus Senior Center in Greenpoint; and the Hope Gardens Community Center in Bushwick).

Edward G. Miner Library is open Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Posted by Susan Andersen


On exhibit @Miner: Mental Health Portraits by Charmaine Wheatley

June 5, 2017

Be honest.

What words came to your mind when you read the title of this exhibit?

Maybe gloomy, depressing, boring?

Well, get ready to be surprised.

Because the exhibit is intimate, playful, spontaneous, and colorful.

Charmaine Wheatley is artist-in-residence at University of Rochester Medical Center. Her goal is to shift perceptions around mental illness. Through her art, Charmaine encourages understanding and provides hope to those who struggle. No labels; no condemnations; no stigma.

Wheatley’s portraits are a breath of fresh air. Her work is informal and intuitive. Each drawing is a pocket-sized 4” x 7-3/8.” She uses watercolor, ink, gel pen, graphite, and gouache on paper.

Artist's studio

“De-stigmatizing happens through humanizing,” says Wheatley. So each portrait sitting involves an open-hearted discussion about living with the challenges of mental illness. Fragments of conversations are integrated within the portrait to create the final piece.

Sitters include people from University of Rochester, Strong Ties, Strong Recovery, Creative Wellness Opportunities, and St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center. They include people experiencing mental health challenges themselves, and/or professionals actively engaged in helping others, like psychiatrists, mental health activists, peer advocates, counselors, and nurses.

After July 1, 2017, Wheatley will shift her focus to the HIV/AIDS community of Rochester.

For more information about the project, visit bit.ly/cwartistinresidence.

About the artist: Since graduating from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Wheatley has received grants from the Canada Council for the Arts; Arts Nova Scotia; and Arts Newfoundland Labrador. During her on-going artist residency at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, she sat in the “Living Room” with museum patrons and employees. An installation of 104 of these portraits is on the view at the museum. Recent related portrait work includes two artist residencies with senior centers in Brooklyn in 2016 (Krakus Senior Center in Greenpoint; and the Hope Gardens Community Center in Bushwick).

 

Edward G. Miner Library is open Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Posted by Susan Andersen


There’s something new in history…

October 6, 2016

…our History of Medicine reading room, that is.

Thanks to the generosity of Richard I. Burton, M.D., we have two, exquisite display cabinets. Dr. Burton also donated a collection of historical portraits and books, collected by him and his father, Kenneth G. Burton, M.D. (1905-1988).Illustration by Vesalius

We plan to unveil some of the 17th- to 19th-century framed prints from the Burton gift along with selections from our own rare book collection.

Currently on display is our first edition (1543) of Andreas Vesalius’ De fabrica corporis humani. This is the most important medical book published during the Renaissance and one of the most influential illustrated books in any discipline or period.

Our copy of the Fabrica is on display (M-F, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.) with a 19th-century engraved print from the Burton collection depicting Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) performing a dissection.

Lithograph of VesaliusEdouard Hamman’s 1849 painting, reproduced as a lithograph by Adolphe Mouilleron in the early 1850s, suggests Vesalius’s conscientious struggle with religion. Religious and cultural forces opposed dissection in Vesalius’s time.

He is pictured as if conflicted in thought, looking at a crucifix on the wall to his right. A skull and several large books suggest his research materials. His dissecting tools and research materials are at hand.

In the coming months we’ll be showing you more treasures from these collections, now that we have an environmentally safe and secure location to do so.  Thank you, Dr. Burton!


Miner Library hosts Shakespeare exhibit: “And There’s the Humor of It”

March 5, 2015

From March 16-April 25, 2015, Edward G. Miner Library will host the National Library of Medicine’s exhibit, “And There’s the Humor of It” Shakespeare and the Four Humors.”

Shakespearelogowithpicture

William Shakespeare (1564–1616) created characters that are among the richest and most humanly recognizable in all of literature. Yet Shakespeare understood human personality in the terms available to his age—that of the now-discarded theory of the four bodily humors—blood, bile, melancholy, and phlegm. These four humors were thought to define peoples’ physical and mental health, and determined their personalities, as well. “And There’s the Humor of It” Shakespeare and the Four Humors explores the language of the four humors that bred the core passions of anger, grief, hope, and fear—the emotions conveyed so powerfully in Shakespeare’s comedies and tragedies.

There will be an opening reception on Wednesday, March 25, from 5:00-6:30 p.m. in Miner Library. The exhibit’s co-curator, Theodore Brown, Ph.D., Professor of History and Medical Humanities and Phelps Professor of Public Health and Policy at the University of Rochester, will give opening remarks.

This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and the Folger Shakespeare Library.

We gratefully acknowledge support from the University Committee for Interdisciplinary Studies Human Values in Health Care Cluster.


“Memento Mori” photographs and poetry by Alex T. Q. Nguyen

May 23, 2014

Photograph by Alex T. Q. Nguyen

Extended through July!

According to Wikipedia, memento mori (Latin for “remember that you will die”) is an artistic or symbolic reminder of the inevitability of death. The expression, memento mori, developed with the growth of Christianity, which emphasized Heaven, Hell, and salvation of the soul in the afterlife.

In her photo essay, Memento Mori, medical student Alex T. Q. Nguyen combines poetry and images surrounding the theme of aging and mortality. For Alex, the images evoke childhood memories and her experiences with end-of-life care as a medical student.

Alex’s images portray her understanding of human suffering, in its many forms, across different ages and locations. In some instances, Alex’s memories of the individuals depicted are all that remains of their legacies. “Their bodies might turn to ash, but their stories live on and help shape who I am and will become as a humanitarian and physician.”

Alex Nguyen

Alex T. Q. Nguyen

“As a third-year medical student, I have only begun to learn about illness in clinical settings. Yet, what often overwhelms me is not necessarily the illness of a patient but rather the complexity of their life. Their stories inspire me to reflect on my own journey through writings and photography. I feel humbled by their kindness to share with me their deepest struggles, which remain as fragments of my memories, yet, continue to challenge my ideals about death and diseases.”

Alex extends her thanks to Dr. Stephanie Brown Clark and Ms. Susan Dodge-Peters Daiss for their support throughout this project.

 

“Memento Mori” is on display through June 2014. Miner Library is open to visitors Monday-Friday, 7:30 am – 8 pm; Saturday-Sunday, 10 am – 8 pm. Call 585.275.3361 for holiday hours.

 

Posted by Susan Andersen


“Our Hands” Paintings by Michele Villa-Castillo exhibited @ Miner

March 18, 2014

University of Rochester’s Edward G. Miner Library hosts an exhibit depicting the shared experience of medical students. The physical work of hands is expressed in addition to their emotional context. Every painting is inspired by true experiences.

2 students Rochester, NY – March 8, 2014 –  The people who work with third-year medical student, Michele Villa-Castillo, all say pretty much the same thing when they first see the corridor filled with large, bright canvases. “How did you find the time?”

Everyone knows how demanding, challenging, and exhausting a medical student’s schedule can be. Somehow, in stolen minutes, Michele managed to create a striking, thought-provoking, inspiring collection of ten canvases with corresponding didactics. Next to each painting, Michele describes the meaning behind the image, and also provides a “behind-the-scenes” progression of smaller images, allowing the viewer a unique inside experience, seeing the evolution of the canvas from concept to fruition, as it coalesces in the artist’s mind.

As most artists realize early in their careers, hands are difficult to capture accurately, let alone expressively. Michele finds hands a welcoming, fascinating challenge. “Hands not only carry our age, but also our communal and individual histories. Our hands make us human: their work and form convey our experiences and emotions. In my paintings, I aim to capture the beauty of hands by exaggerating color and proportion… My hope is that such immediacy recreates the sense of urgency and vitality we feel when we care for patients—and ourselves—during our medical training.”

Born in Wisconsin, Michele now calls Texas her home. She did her undergraduate work at University of Rochester. Both parents are from Colombia, South America.

Michele dedicates her artistic talent to her grandmother, who is a painter in Colombia. Michele has been drawing “since I can remember” and is fortunate to have parents who recognized and encouraged her artistic interest. It was during medical school anatomy class that Michele developed a particular passion and appreciation for hand anatomy and became inspired to focus on painting hands.  “As my career continues, I hope to incorporate my love for art with my passion for medicine because both are a part of who I am.”

“Our Hands” will be on display through April 2015. Miner Library is open to visitors Monday-Friday, 7:30 am – 8 pm; Saturday-Sunday, 10 am – 8 pm. Call 585.275.3361 for holiday hours.

Posted by Susan Andersen